Wednesday, 3 May 2017

What An Incy Wincy Spider You Have.


Today i've welcomed a new member to my little Arachnid family. This time the new member is not a part of the 'Theraphosidae' family, most likely known to you as the 'Tarantula'. Nope, this time i have a true spider species. 

It has taken me months to decide which true spider was the one for me, initially my heart being set on the 'Nephila Pilipes' after having seen one in Thailand. Pilipes are best left to web up in a suitable room, due to the huge web size produced by these spiders they can not easily be kept in enclosures. Keeping them in an enclosure often results in them not being able to produce their web and ultimately leading to death. Now, i'd be down with them roaming my room, but i have my fur babies to think about, whilst they aren't venomous enough to kill me, the same can't be said for my rats.

Whilst browsing the discover function on Instagram, up popped the cutest spider i had ever seen and that spider was the 'Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus Regius)'. Distributed throughout the Southeastern US this spider is a larger species of jumping spider with females reaching an average of 15mm with the males slightly smaller at an average of 12mm. The males and females are easy to differentiate with the males always being black and white with females ranging from grey to a bright orange.

I believe mine to be a male but at a incy wincy 2mm it's difficult to truly tell, besides i wouldn't be mad either way with both males and females being as equally adorable. Which just leaves the question, what on earth did i name this little guy? One of the most striking parts of this spider are the iridescent chelicerae, shifting from turquoise to violet tones it reminded me of the chemical element 'Bismuth', once oxidised it turns into a spectrum of colour. So, meet little Bismuth. 

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

My Tarantula Has Turned Into A Different Species!?


Chrysa my tarantula spiderling has changed species overnight, once known as an Avicularia Versicolor she has 'magically transformed' and in so doing has become part of a newly recognised genus known as the Caribena and shall now be known as the Caribena Versicolor.

Okay, so quite obviously my tarantula hasn't changed one bit but rather two Arachnologists have created a new genus in which the Versicolor will now fall under as of March 2017. What makes them fall under this new Caribena genus and no longer part of the Avicularia?

Well there are two main reasons why this genus has been created and so far only two tarantulas have been accepted; both of which were previously part of the Avicularia Genus. Unlike Avicularia, Caribena are found in the Antilles whereas Avicularia species are found in mainland South and Central America. The other reason for this separation is a physical characteristic as Caribena are distinguished by having longer and thinner type II urticating hairs in a conspicuous patch on the upper surface of the abdomen. 

Interesting right!? I imagine that changing species is hard work but Chrysa doesn't seem too fussed about it all.